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December 17, 2020

Standard Ground Handling Agreement (Sgha) 2018

Filed under: Uncategorized — Mark Baker @ 2:35 pm

The amended clause 7.3 and the new clause 7.4 give the handler the right to suspend services if the airline does not require an immediate advance or cash payment in the event of insolvency. Given the historical liquidity problems faced by some airlines, it is perhaps surprising that these clauses have not yet been included in the SGHA. This does not mean that the resolution of the companies will be nothing but unsecured creditors for unpaid bills. Under current SGHA legislation, cash advances or advances may violate applicable local insolvency legislation. The 38th edition of the IATA Airport Handling Manual (AHM) is now live. The AHM contains the most recent iteration of the SGHA, which reflects the evolution of aviation and more broadly, and which results from the consultation and contribution of airlines, handling companies and other players in the sector. Many of these changes are only editorial, SGHA Amendment 2013. However, some changes are significant and focus on operational practices, improved standards, training, insolvency, claims and compliance in general. We briefly reviewed the major changes to the main agreement and Schedule B and looked at what they might mean to users.

In 2013, the IATA Ground Support Council authorized the use of yellow pages for the publication of pages of text amending Appendix B in the years between the new versions of the SGHA. SGHA 2018 Appendix B has now fully added the yellow pages to paragraph 8. In the future, this will provide some flexibility in the basic model. Check out the latest updates to the IATA SGHA 2018 model and the new Service Level Agreement (SLA) model. This advanced course covers the main elements of SGHA 2018 and provides an overview of concepts and structure at the company level. Learn how to use the latest tools to improve collaboration and safeguard business interest by combining Schedule B and AHM803 ALS models. It goes without saying that airlines have their own ground operating manuals, other service provider guidelines, codes of conduct, approach policies, customer service (e.g.B. customer charter), style and even brand. Handling companies are often the face of an airline in an airport. Airlines must provide sufficient information to enable assistance companies to perform the processing properly (new point 5.1). The training provisions contained in the new Term 5.6 contain the knowledge by trade agents of rules and regulations as a minimum and cross-reference to IATA documents in point 5.3. This new clause will protect assistance companies if an airline attempts to circumvent an unfavourable contract and merely include its requirements “in the source.” However, in practice, it is difficult to imagine, unless an airline has sufficient resources (for example.

B of ground support personnel and equipment) who are ready to follow in the footsteps of a well-established operator.

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