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December 2, 2020

Agreements At Yalta Conference

Filed under: Uncategorized — Mark Baker @ 11:53 am

Each of the three heads of state and government had their own agenda for post-war Germany and liberated Europe. Roosevelt wanted Soviet support in the American Pacific War against Japan, particularly for the planned invasion of Japan (Operation August Storm) and Soviet participation in the United Nations; Churchill insisted on free elections and democratic governments in Central and Eastern Europe (particularly Poland); Stalin called for a Soviet sphere of political influence in Central and Eastern Europe as an essential aspect of the USSR`s national security strategy. Stalin`s position at the conference was one he believed to be so strong that he could dictate conditions. According to the member of the American delegation and future Foreign Minister, James F. Byrnes, “it was not a question of what we would leave to the Russians, but what we could do to the Russians” [9] The French head of state, General Charles de Gaulle, was not invited to either the Yalta conference or the Potsdam conference. , a small diplomat who has aroused deep and persistent resentment. [5] De Gaulle attributed his exclusion from Yalta to Roosevelt`s long-standing personal antagonism against him, although the Soviet Union also refused his admission as a full participant. But the absence of a French representation in Yalta also meant that De Gaulle`s invitation to the Potsdam conference would have been very problematic. It would then have felt honourable to insist on the need to reopen all the issues agreed upon in Yalta in his absence. [6] But as his troops occupied much of Germany and Eastern Europe, Stalin was able to effectively ratify the concessions he won at Yalta and put pressure on his advance on Truman and Churchill (replaced in the middle of the conference by Prime Minister Clement Atlee).

In March 1946, barely a year after the Yalta Conference, Churchill delivered his famous speech in which he declared that an “iron curtain” had fallen on Eastern Europe, marking the definitive end of cooperation between the Soviet Union and its Western allies and the beginning of the Cold War. The Potsdam conference was held from July to August 1945, which was also attended by Clement Attlee (who had replaced Churchill as Prime Minister) and President Harry S Truman (who represented the United States after Roosevelt`s death). [39] In Potsdam, the Soviets disputed allegations that they had interfered in the affairs of Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary. [34] The conference led to (1) Potsdam`s declaration on Japan`s surrender[40] and (2) the Potsdam Agreement on the Soviet annexation of the former Polish territory to the curzon Line and provisions that will be addressed in a possible final treaty to end the Second World War on the annexation of parts of Germany east of the Oder-Neisse line to Poland. and North-East Prussia to the Soviet Union. The first reaction to the Yalta Accords was solemn. Roosevelt and many other Americans saw this as proof that the spirit of US-Soviet war cooperation would be transmitted until the post-war period. But this feeling was only short-lived.

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